PUBLICATIONS

2016

Frasconi Wendt, C. and Verble-Pearson, R.M. Accepted.  Critical thermal maxima and body size positively correlate in red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta.  Southwestern Naturalist.

Verble-Pearson, R.M. and S.W. Pearson. In press. European fire ants impact arboreal arthropod diversity in Acadia National Park. Natural Areas Journal.

2015

Granberg, R.M., Perry, G. and Verble-Pearson, R.M. 2015. Using historic evidence to inform habitat restoration decisions for the Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum).  Post Oaks and Prairies Journal 1: 25-35.

Verble-Pearson, R.M., M.E. Gifford, and S.P. Yanoviak. 2015. Variation in thermal tolerance of North American ants. Journal of Thermal Biology 48: 65-68.

2014

Brudz, V.*, R. Granberg, and R. Verble-Pearson.  2014.  Male-male interactions in Phyrnosoma cornutum.  Herpetological Review 45: 503-504.

Verble-Pearson, R.M. and S.P. Yanoviak. 2014.  Responses of Ozark insect communities to intense fires. American Midland Naturalist. 172: 14-24.

2013

Verble, R.M.  2013.  Legacy of Tall Timbers Research Station.  Ecology 94:  1887-1888.

Verble, R.M. and S.P. Yanoviak. 2013. Short-term responses of Ozark ant communities to fire.  Annals of the Entomological Society of America 106: 198-203.

2012

Verble, R.M., A.D. Meyer*, M.G. Kleve, and S.P. Yanoviak.  2012. Exoskeletal thinning in Cephalotes atratus caused by Myrmeconema neotropicum.  Journal of Parasitology 96: 226-228.

2010

T.N. Wood, D.D. Demisse, R.M. Verble, G. Robert and C. Solorzano.  2010.  Scientific journals and government agencies should review papers for biosecurity concerns and refrain from publishing information that may be helpful to bioterrorists:  Con position.  American Entomologist 55:  150-152.

2009

Verble, R.M. and F.M. Stephen.  2009.  Occurrence of Carpenter Ants in Ozark Forests in Relation to Prescribed Fire and Stand Variables. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 33: 42-45.


Verble, R.M. and F.M. Stephen.  2009.  Occurrence of Camponotus pennsylvanicus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in trees previously infested with Enaphalodes rufulus (Coleoptera:  Cerambycidae) in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas.  Florida Entomologist 92:  304-308