Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Spring 2015 Round-Up

The Spring 2015 semester has come to a close at Texas Tech.  This semester was markedly different for me, since I spent most of it on maternity leave.  While I have enjoyed spending time with my new kiddo, I am excited to get back to work full time.  But, it turns out, the old adage about the cat being away and the mice playing didn't hold true for my lab.  They've been busy doing all kinds of cool stuff!

Rachel Granberg was featured in a cool documentary on the Texas horned lizard.  Check it out!

Rachel, Gad Perry and I recently had a paper accepted in the Post Oaks and Prairies Journal.

Nick Goforth successfully defended his M.S. thesis on wildfires and bats.

Additionally, Seth Pearson and I recently had a paper accepted in the Natural Areas Journal.

I was profiled by Great Plains Fire Science.  Interview, here.

Britt Smith and undergraduate volunteers participated in prescribed burns to improve quail habitat with Global Frontline Solutions.

In total, this spring, the TTU Fire Lab assisted with just under 4,000 acres of prescribed fire.

And, finally, a couple of great undergraduate fire guys got their diplomas:

Neil Estes and Anton Gereau have both been enthusiastic and highly competent prescribed burners and leaders in our undergraduate fire program.  While I wish each of them the absolute best of luck in the their future endeavors, I am sure going to miss having them around!  Congratulations, guys!!

Anton Gereau (right) with Derrick Holdstock (TX Parks and Wildlife, left) burning at Lubbock Lake Landmark in 2014

Neil Estes on his first burn at Lubbock Lake Landmark, January 2014

Monday, May 4, 2015

Alumni Spotlight-- Cameron Ward

This is the second in a recurring series of posts about TTU Fire alumni and their current positions.

Cameron Ward graduated from Texas Tech's Department of Natural Resources in December 2013.  Since graduation, he has been a seasonal employee with the USDA Forest Service.  
Below he discusses his current position.


I am a seasonal biological technician working for the USDA Forest Service. I have worked for the Umpqua National Forest in Oregon and now work for the Cimarron National Grassland in Kansas. In Oregon I worked on noxious weed control to helped restore habitat after logging operations are done. I also surveys on prey of the spotted owl and I helped with the fire crew sometimes on the weekend. Now I’m doing Lesser Prairie Chicken surveys and assessing habitat quality for them on the grassland.

My time with the Forest Service has been great-- I’ve been able to meet new people and learn many new skills. It’s amazing being able to work in these beautiful places and see new things.


His advice for future new graduates:

"To get a job like this I’d recommend being persistent on applying and being patient. My advice on the job is to seize all opportunities for experience. Most of the people have been in your shoes and want to help you get more experience."